Hello, I Am A Nobody

3 Thoughts On The Ministry Of Everyday Pastors

nobody

 

The first chapter in John’s Gospel records the story of Jesus calling a set of brothers to follow him. These brothers were fishermen.

  • One of them went on to be the spokesmen of the disciples.  The other didn’t.
  • One of these brothers was the first to confess that Jesus was the Christ, the Son of God.  The other stood by while it happened.
  • One of these brothers went on to preach on the day of Pentecost and saw 3,000 people saved.  The other was also doing amazing things that day, just not preaching the big sermon.
  • One of these brothers went on to lead the church, write inspired Scripture, and have stories told of his martyrdom.  The other did miracles and made disciples faithfully.

Peter was the first brother. He’s frequently characterized as a bold, powerful, strong, and notable leader although a little rash and brash at times.  Peter is amazing.  So is his brother Andrew…  Andrews are important too.  Andrews are the everyday pastor who leads an everyday church and faithfully leads people to Jesus, disciples them, and cares for the church.  Andrews are nobodies and nobodies matter.

 

 

Nobodies Matter

 

1) The vast majority of churches are pastored by Andrews-Types

Most of the people in the world are under the ministry of Andrew-Type pastors.  Andrew-Types shepherd most of Jesus’ disciples.  Unassuming leaders who help to proclaim the Kingdom’s advance play a vital role in the growth of the church.  They are gifted.  They are equippers of the saints.  They don’t get asked to be on the big stages or TV or radio, but they are doing ministry.

 

 

2) The burden of celebrity destroys many faithful men

There are many famous pastors and Christian leaders who have continued to be faithful men of God.  I thank God for the men like Billy Graham, John Piper, Tony Evans, and David Jeremiah (and many others).  They are famous Peter-Types who live for Jesus and not for their own fame.  However, for every one of those guys there are 10 others who started out working hard for the fame of Jesus, their platform expanded, and somewhere along the line something switched and the power of their own celebrity began to control them.  I like what the political pundit, James Carville says, “When you become famous, being famous becomes your profession.” I think in many ways that is what has happened to celebrity pastors.

  • Sometimes this results in major falls from grace with men drifting into deep sin issues.
  • Sometimes their ministry continues and their platform expands, but they are worried about building their kingdom rather than Christ’s.

Faithfulness is a better aim than fame.

 

 

3) Contentment is key

I think a lot of the problem is that a lot of Andrew-types want to be Peter-types.  They haven’t made peace with the fact that they are special because they’ve been called by a King, not because they’ve been called to be a king.  Everyday Pastors matter.  We aren’t all Spurgeon or Billy Graham or Matt Chandler.  We are nobodies. There is nothing wrong with being nobodies.  Nobodies accomplish a lot for the Kingdom.  We have to deny ourselves.  We have to relinquish our fame desires for the sake of Christ’s fame.

 

This post is drawn from my book, Proliferate, A Church Planting Strategy for Everyday Churches.  If you haven’t already you can pick it up from Amazon (Paperback or Kindle) or Barnes & Noble (Paperback or Nook).

Every Church Planter Needs: A Coach

Part 3 of a 3 part series on the people that every church planter needs

 

Ever since we planted CityView Church in 2014 we’ve gotten multiple questions about what church planters need.  Aside from a strong and growing relationship with Jesus, the support of their spouse, Kingdom dollars invested in their plant or team members to join their core team, I always tell them that every planter needs three people who speak into their lives that help them plant in a healthy manner.  Every planter needs 3 specific people.  This blog series will share the three people that every church planter needs in his life.

Coach

Every church planter needs a coach.  It is easy for church planters to get bogged down in minutia of church life and church planting issues.  The coach cheers the planter on and pushes him when he isn’t accomplishing all that he could.  The coach is someone that the planter should pay for his time.  I have paid as little as $100/month, but am currently receiving coaching for $250/month.  My first coach was Sam Douglass.  I am currently coached by Brian Howard

Every church planter needs someone to get in their face a little when they aren’t doing what they should.  They also need someone outside of the situation to point out issues in what is going on within the church.  The coach can do this important work.

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Greatest Value

The most valuable thing a coach can do is drill down deep on a single issue that the planter is having, ask questions, and cause the planter to process through the issue out loud with someone else.  The coach can ask questions with little knowledge of the situation and bring in a different perspective to help the planter correct his actions.

 

How Do I Find One?

Your denomination or network should have some sort of coaching network setup or be able to point you in the right direction.  Contact the church plant leadership in your network or denomination and they’ll help you find a good one.  If worse comes to worse, I coach planters regularly to help them work through the early days of planting and thinking through how they can multiply.  I’d be happy to help, you can contact me here.

 

This series is drawn from my book, Proliferate, A Church Planting Strategy for Everyday Churches.  If you haven’t already you can pick it up from Amazon (Paperback or Kindle) or Barnes & Noble (Paperback or Nook).

 

 

Every Church Planter Needs: A Counselor

Part 2 of a 3 part series on the people that every church planter needs

Counselor

Ever since we planted CityView Church in 2014 we’ve gotten multiple questions about what church planters need.  Aside from a strong and growing relationship with Jesus, the support of their spouse, Kingdom dollars invested in their plant or team members to join their core team, I always tell them that every planter needs three people who speak into their lives that help them plant in a healthy manner.  Every planter needs 3 specific people.  This blog series will share the three people that every church planter needs in his life.

Counselor

Every church planter needs a counselor.  Church planting is hard work and is wrought with frequent discouragement.  Church planters need a counselor.  To be clear this is someone that you pay.  Be it a licensed Christian counselor, biblical counselor, or the like this is someone you pay for their time and their expertise that hears the struggles and pains that the planter has and points them towards the Lord and His Word.

Greatest Value

The most valuable thing a counselor can do is help the planter feel heard in the many struggles and hurts that he will experience.  The counselor needs to help the planter identify detrimental thought patterns and behaviors and point him towards healthy, gospel-centered ones as he deals with the ups and downs of planting.  This person is doing soul-care for the planter.

 

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What Will People Think?

My short answer is, WHO CARES?  I know you need a counselor.  I bet you know you need a counselor.  Who cares what someone else thinks?  However, because a stigma exists about counseling, and you may have some feelings about it yourself, realize that you don’t have to tell anyone that you are seeing a counselor.  This doesn’t need to be a thing that is broadcast openly if you are worried about it.  It can be as private as you want it to be.

 

 

How Do I Find One?

We use a counseling service called, Better Days here in Houston.  They were recommended to us, but they are part of the Association of Biblical Counselors, a group we know and trust.  If that isn’t your tribe then Google counseling for pastors in your general area and you will find someone.  I’m proud of my denomination for offering care for pastors.  Check it out here.

 

This series is drawn from my book, Proliferate, A Church Planting Strategy for Everyday Churches.  If you haven’t already you can pick it up from Amazon (Paperback or Kindle) or Barnes & Noble (Paperback or Nook).

 

 

Every Church Planter Needs: A Mentor

Part 1 of a 3 part series on the people that every church planter needs

Mentor

Ever since we planted CityView Church in 2014 we’ve gotten multiple questions about what church planters need.  Aside from a strong and growing relationship with Jesus, the support of their spouse, Kingdom dollars invested in their plant or team members to join their core team, I always tell them that every planter needs three people who speak into their lives that help them plant in a healthy manner.  Every planter needs 3 specific people.  This blog series will share the three people that every church planter needs in his life.

Mentor

Every church planter needs a mentor.  They need someone who has gone before them and done similar work to what they are attempting to do now.  The mentor is so important because he lets the planter know that what they are attempting is possible.  He brings encouragement on a regular basis.

 

Greatest Value

The most valuable thing a mentor can share is their experiences, both good and bad.  This authenticity helps the planter know that at the end of the day there is hope.  The mentor shows the planter that no matter how difficult it gets you can come out on the other side.  The mentor can provide a target for the planter to aim for over the course of their ministry.

There is definite value in having several mentors in the planter’s life that might be able to address different issues at different times in areas related to church life cycle, attendance trends, and family. In many ways, a mentor is a pastor to a church planter. I have been blessed to have a couple of these amazing men in my life as I planted, Greg Pickering of Brazos Pointe Fellowship in Lake Jackson, TX and Bruce Wesley of Clear Creek Community Church in League City, TX.

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How Do I Find One?

You find a mentor by thinking about the people in your life who have started like you have and have a track record that you respect.  Think beyond your peer group.  Look to a generation older than you.  You narrow down on one or two guys and then you take them to lunch or coffee and ask them to mentor you.  You will find that quality men want to be asked to do this type of thing.  They want to reproduce themselves in other young leaders.

 

How Do I Become One?

Greg Pickering became my mentor when he found me at a fellowship meeting for our county and said, “Hi Jason, I’m Greg, I’m you in 20 years”.  Younger generations desperately want the tutelage of those who have gone before.  You have a lot to share.  Look around at young guys in your pastoral circles and make an investment.

 

This series is drawn from my book, Proliferate, A Church Planting Strategy for Everyday Churches.  If you haven’t already you can pick it up from Amazon (Paperback or Kindle) or Barnes & Noble (Paperback or Nook).

 

 

Excited to be on the Battle Cry Revival Podcast on March 27, 2017.  We’ll be talking about my book Proliferate, church planting, and general Life Hacks.  Release date will be posted soon.

Date: March 27, 2017
Time: 4:00 p.m.
Appearance: Battle Cry Revival Podcast
Outlet: Battle Cry Revival
Location: Alvin, TX
Format: Podcast

Goals Need to be RELEVANT

Tips to help make your goals relevant

Relevant

You may want to watch every new movie on Netflix, but unless you are a internet TV blogger it isn’t relevant to your personal growth.  Your goals need to be relevant to who you want to be over a lifetime.

You need to have goals that are relevant to your station in life and your own growth. When you write a goal it needs to be relevant to some greater purpose that you have. It has to have meaning behind it.  The goal needs to hold meaning for you.  When a goal is relevant then you have motivation to keep pushing towards it when the excitement has worn off.  I love this quote by Viktor Frankl

“Those who have a ‘why’ can bear with almost any ‘how’.

Tips to help you clarify

  • Where do you want to be in 10 years? 5 years? 3 years?  Does the goal help you get there?
  • Why is this goal important to you?   Should it be?
  • What are the benefits of this goal for your long term growth and development.

 

Click on one of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals elements below to jump to a more specific description of that area.  Click here to get an overview of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals system.

SPECIFIC
MEASURABLE
ACHIEVABLE
RELEVANT
TIME BOUND
EVALUATE
SHARE
TAILOR

Goals Need to be TIME BOUND

Tips to make your goals time bound

time

Goals have to have a definite starting point and ending point.  I work really well with a deadline.  I want to know when something needs to be completed.  Time matters when it comes to writing goals.  Most of the goals I’ve talked about are annual.  They could all have an end date of 12/31 or if you are following the way I do my goals then 1/31.  Time bound is essential for working through the progressive necessity of goals.  You may want to lose 30 pounds by the end of the year, but you aren’t going to come to December 30th and see how you’re doing on your weight loss goal.  Set monthly and weekly time bound sub goals that help you attain your goal progressively.

 

Tips to help you clarify

  • Is your goal an annual goal?  Should it be a 2 year goal or longer?
  • What are some milestones associated with your goal?
  • How can you break it up into quarterly, monthly or weekly chunks?

Click on one of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals elements below to jump to a more specific description of that area.  Click here to get an overview of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals system.

SPECIFIC
MEASURABLE
ACHIEVABLE
RELEVANT
TIME BOUND
EVALUATE
SHARE
TAILOR

Goals Need to be SPECIFIC

Tips to help make your goals specific

specific

Goals needs to be specific.  The destination needs to be obvious.  Your goal needs to have a very clear target.  Words like “more” and “less” are off limits when writing a goal. Ideas like “do better” or “weigh less” are also strictly prohibited.  Vague is the enemy of accomplishing goals.  You’ve got to know what you want to accomplish…exactly.

Do’s and Don’ts of Specific

  • Don’t say, “save more”. Do say, “save $1000.”
  • Don’t say,  “lose weight”. Do say, “lose 10lbs.”
  • Don’t say, “get better at returning emails”. Do say, “set a reminder to check and respond to emails at 5pm.”
  • Don’t say, “have more blog followers”.  Do say, “have 1000 new blog followers”.

The more specific you can get the better.  Specificity brings definition to the goal.

Tips to help you clarify

  • What EXACTLY do you want to accomplish this year?
  • Where do you want to go EXACTLY?
  • Ask a friend, mentor, or coach and see if they understand your goal.  Is it obvious to them what you are trying to accomplish?

 

 

Click on one of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals elements below to jump to a more specific description of that area.  Click here to get an overview of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals system.

SPECIFIC
MEASURABLE
ACHIEVABLE
RELEVANT
TIME BOUND
EVALUATE
SHARE
TAILOR

 

Goals Need to be MEASURABLE

Tips to help make your goals measurable

measurable
 

A couple years ago I wanted to improve my physical endurance.  I set the goal of completing a marathon which means moving forward for 26.2 miles over the course of hours.  It was easy to see during training runs that I was going further.  Each month I could see progress towards the measurable goal of 26.2.Your goals need to be measurable.  You need to be able to know when you’ve achieved the goal.  You need to be able to see progress and movement forward towards the goal.  This aspect goes hand-in-hand with specific.  Specific focus helps define the measurable aspect of the goal.  When annual goals are measurable it aids in the process of setting monthly goals that help achieve it.

 

Tips to help you clarify

  • What number can be associated with the goal?  Maybe it is a distance you want to be able to run or an amount you want to put in your retirement account.
  • Is it possible to see progress towards your goal?   Where do you want to be in April? July? November?
  • If you are having trouble coming up with a measure you may need to make your goal more narrow and specific.

 

Click on one of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals elements below to jump to a more specific description of that area.  Click here to get an overview of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals system.

SPECIFIC
MEASURABLE
ACHIEVABLE
RELEVANT
TIME BOUND
EVALUATE
SHARE
TAILOR

Goals Need to be ACHIEVABLE

Tips to help make your goals achievable

Achievable
 

I recently completed a marathon.  That was a stretch, but an achievable goal based on my ability level, size, and talent as a runner.  All it essentially requires is that you need to be able to endure pain and boredom for a long period of time and not stop moving your legs forward.  It would absurd for me to make my goal to set the world record in the marathon or win the Chevron Marathon.  Those goals aren’t achievable, they are ridiculous.  Don’t write ridiculous goals.Your goals need to be achievable.  The goal needs to require stretching, but also be attainable if you are diligent and disciplined.  This is a tightrope to walk.  Don’t make the goal to easy. Don’t make the goal to hard.  Unless you are in your last year in college you can’t graduate within a year most likely, but perhaps you could graduate in two years.  You can accomplish more than you think you can when focus on the goal, but be honest with yourself about what is actually doable.

 

Tips to help you clarify

  • Is it reasonable to see yourself achieving this goal within a year?
  • Based on your current position and ability level will this goal stretch you, but not demoralize you?
  • Would your goal be better as a 3 year goal with separate annual goals?

Click on one of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals elements below to jump to a more specific description of that area.  Click here to get an overview of the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. Goals system.


SPECIFIC
MEASURABLE
ACHIEVABLE
RELEVANT
TIME BOUND
EVALUATE
SHARE
TAILOR